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Got CO2?

Elevating carbon dioxide levels can increase growth speed a great deal, perhaps even double it.

It seems that the plant evolved in primordial times when natural CO2 levels were many times what they are today. The plant uses CO2 for photosynthesis to create sugars it uses to build plant tissues. Elevating the CO2 level will increase the plants ability to manufacture these sugars and plant growth rate is enhanced considerably.

CO2 is most usable for flowering, as this is when the plant is most dense and has the hardest time circulating air around its leaves.

If your strictly growing marijuana vegetatively indoors, (transferring your plants outdoors to flower), then CO2 will not be a major concern unless you have a sealed greenhouse, closet or bedroom, and wish to increase yield and decrease flowering time.

The basic CO2 tank system looks like this:

20 lb tank $129

Regulator $159

Timer or controller $10-$125

Fill up $20

For a small closet, one tank could last 2 months, but it depends on how much is released, how often the room is vented, hours of light cycle, room leaks, enrichment levels and dispersion methods.

This method may be overkill for your small closet.

It is generally viewed as good to have a small constant flow of CO2 over the plants at all times the lights are on, dispersed directly over the plants during the time exhaust fans are off.

Opportunities exist to conserve CO2, but this can cost money. When the light is off you don’t need CO2, so during flowering, you will use half as much if you have the CO2 solenoid setup to your light timer. When the fan is on for venting, CO2 is shut off as well. This may be up to half the time the light is on, so this will affect the plants exposure times and amount of gas actually dispensed.

Environmentally, using bottled gas is better, since manufacturing it adds to greenhouse effect, and bottled CO2 is captured as part of the manufacturing process of many materials, and then recycled.

Fermenting, CO2 generators, and baking soda and vinegar methods all generate new CO2 and add to greenhouse effect.

CO2 generation from fermentation and generators is possible. A simple CO2 generator would be a propane heater. This will work well, as long as the gases can be vented to the grow area, and a fan is used to keep the hot CO2 (that will rise) circulating and available below at the plants level. Fire and exhaust venting of the heat are issues as well. A room that must be vented 50% of the time to rid the environment of heat from a lamp and heater will not receive as much CO2 as a room that can be kept unvented for hours at a time. However, CO2 generators are the only way to go for large operations.

Excellofizz is perfect for the grower who has been considering the use of CO2 but has been hesitating due to the high cost factor, or for growers in a small area.

Excellofizz is ideal for small indoor gardens. It allows for a simple and economical way of providing somewhat accurate CO2 to your plants with no equipment needed for dispensing or monitoring, especially in situations where venting is limited. Excellofizz emits the proper CO2 levels for indoor plants by reacting and giving off pure CO2 gas and also absorbing oxygen from the air. Simply place one of the Excellofizz pucks into the container provided. Pour 2-1/2 ounces of water into the container and leave the lid open slightly. Excellofizz will then slowly react, emitting the proper amount of CO2 gas for approximately 8 hours into the photo period. Excellofizz will then continue to increase CO2 levels after the reaction has completely subsided by absorbing oxygen from the air. Excellofizz is also fragrented with eucalyptus which is also known to repel mites and kill airborne bacteria.

Each puck, when reacted, will emit enough CO2 gas in a 10′ x 12′ area to raise the level by approximately 1600ppm. This will give a total of 1900-2200ppm for optimum growth. Many growers with smaller areas will break the pucks into two or more pieces to get more use out of the Excellofizz kit. Each Excellofizz Kit comes with 15 pucks.

The basic CO2 tank system looks like this:

20 lb tank $129

Regulator $159

Timer or controller $10-$125

Fill up $20

Worst case = $395 for CO2 tank setup synced to a exhaust fan with a thermostat.

For a small closet, one tank could last 2 months, but it depends on how much is released, how often the room is vented, hours of light cycle, room leaks, enrichment levels and dispersion methods. This method may be overkill for your small closet.

It is generally viewed as good to have a small constant flow of CO2 over the plants at all times the lights are on, dispersed directly over the plants during the time exhaust fans are off.

Opportunities exist to conserve CO2, but this can cost money. When the light is off you don’t need CO2, so during flowering, you will use half as much if you have the CO2 solenoid setup to your light timer. When the fan is on for venting, CO2 is shut off as well. This may be up to half the time the light is on, so this will affect the plants exposure times and amount of gas actually dispensed.

Environmentally, using bottled gas is better, since manufacturing it adds to greenhouse effect, and bottled CO2 is captured as part of the manufacturing process of many materials, and then recycled. Fermenting, CO2 generators, and baking soda and vinegar methods all generate new CO2 and add to greenhouse effect.

CO2 generation from fermentation and generators is possible. A simple CO2 generator would be a propane heater. This will work well, as long as the gases can be vented to the grow area, and a fan is used to keep the hot CO2 (that will rise) circulating and available below at the plants level. Fire and exhaust venting of the heat are issues as well. A room that must be vented 50% of the time to rid the environment of heat from a lamp and heater will not receive as much CO2 as a room that can be kept unvented for hours at a time. However, CO2 generators are the only way to go for large operations.

As long as the plant has the opportunity to take in new CO2 at all times, from air that is over 200 ppm CO2, the plants will have the required nutrients for photosynthesis. Most closets will need new CO2 coming in every two or three hours, minimum. Most cities will have high concentrations of CO2 in the air, and some growers find CO2 injection unnecessary in these circumstances.

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