Post navigation

Gardening

Guano

The 100% Natural Organic Soil Amendment

The word guano originated from the Quichua language of the Inca civilization and means “the droppings of sea birds”. It is a misnomer to refer to bat dung as guano. As the word is used today, guano describes both bat and sea bird manure.

The most famous guano was that used by the Inca.

The guano would collect on the rainless islands and coast of Peru. Atmospheric conditions insured a minimal loss of nutrients. There is very little leaching of valuable material, nor is there a considerable loss of nitrogenous matter. For this the Inca would guard and regulate the treasured soil enricher. Access to the guano deposits were restricted to chosen caretakers. Disrupting the rookeries could result in punishment by death.

Guano became a very important part of the development of agriculture in these United States.

During the peak of the guano era, drastic steps were taken to maintain a supply for the U.S. farmer. “On August 18, 1856, Congress passed an act to authorize protection to be given to citizens of the United States who may discover guano, under which any citizen of the United States was authorized to take possession of and occupy any unclaimed island, rock or key containing guano. The discoverers of such islands were entitled to exclusive rights to the deposits thereon, but the guano could only be removed for the use of the citizens of the United States.

“Nutrients in guano are as different as there are a variety of producers, food sources and environmental constraints.

Sea birds eat strictly small fish and are not scavengers. Bat guano is available from one species that thrives on fruit, while another feasts on insects. Guano can be fresh, semi-fossilized or fossilized and will be a factor, among others, on the nutrient content when used.

Guano is provided in the ready to use condition, thoroughly aged to the vintage state of a good natural fertilizer.

Guano can be used inside or outdoors for all living plants. Guano supplies fast and slow release nutrients to the biological system. Apply the pure guano in smaller amounts than ordinary barnyard or poultry manure. Applied as a top dressing and worked into the soil or mixed with water and applied, guano will have a dramatic influence.

Hydroponic growers, in contrast to normal fertilization, are finding that guano and water are a natural alternative to chemical solutions.

Use nitrogen guano for growth, phosphorus guano for budding and all guano for your plants general health and well being. Guano can be blended with topsoil before laying sod or grass seed and while planting trees and shrubs. Add guano to your container growing mix for a supercharged potting soil.