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Can I use too much/too many beneficials?

Roots Excelurator, Sea Green, Mycos, Great White, etc… Is mixing many better than using one?

When using beneficial bacteria strains, beneficial fungal strains, and living microbial communities in your growth medium you are initiating a symbiotic relationship between the living rhizosphere of your plant and the living biology you have inoculated your medium with such as Sea Green, Mykos, House and Garden Roots Excelurator, Great White, Bountea etc. The symbiotic relationship you have created is taking place where your roots excrete sugars in the rhizoshpere that are consumed by the beneficial bacteria and microbial populations. The bacteria then excrete waste, which is beneficial for your plants root-zone.This symbiotic relationship is responsible for the thousands of tiny feeder root hairs on your plants roots. When you have larger and more abundant feeder hairs on your roots, nutrients become more easily absorbed because of the increase in surface area in the root-zone.

With regard to how often you should apply these beneficial bacteria, beneficial fungal strains, and living microbial populations, this will depend on what type of medium you use and how well you maintain it. Generally, inoculating these beneficial bacteria, beneficial fungal strains, and living microbial populations one-time, bi-weekly, will give you all the benefits of creating the symbiotic relationship between bacteria and roots, without spending too much money on these products. If you are a hydroponic gardener who maintains a reservoir that is completely drained and refilled on a weekly basis, re-inoculating the new reservoir with beneficial bacteria, beneficial fungal strains, and living microbial populations is recommended.

When maintaining a bed of soil or container gardening using a soil or soil-less blend, a bi-weekly inoculation is recommended. If at anytime you use hydrogen peroxide or copper in your nutrient solution it will kill all beneficial bacteria, beneficial fungal strains, and living microbial populations so be sure on what you add to your medium when you have inoculated it. Using tap water with high levels of chlorine will also hinder the growth of the beneficial biology you are inoculating. I have yet to hear of someone having hindered plant growth based on using too many beneficial bacteria, beneficial fungal strains, and living microbial populations, however using them at a bi-weekly rate seems to give exponential benefits to your plants while not costing too much money.

The only product mentioned that I would apply every nutrient feeding at full strength would be the Roots Excelurator from House and Garden. This product creates an excellent environment for the beneficial bacteria, beneficial fungal strains, and living microbial populations to live in the rhizosphere of your root-zone. This product works wonders for all of your gardening needs. Mixing these combinations of beneficial bacteria, beneficial fungal strains, and living microbial populations is perfectly acceptable and is very common. Overlapping on bacteria strains can become expensive however, so knowing the difference between what bacteria strains you are feeding your plants is important; supplying many different fungal and bacterial strains is excellent. If you have any further questions, feel free to give us a call anytime or drop us another email at your convenience. Happy Gardening

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