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DIY Succulent Terrarium

For this DIY project we have decided to highlight succulents. Not only do most varieties of succulents thrive in San Diego’s warm climate, but they are nearly indestructible. When it comes to my outdoor garden, I seek out plants that are low maintenance but still aesthetically pleasing. Succulents satisfy both these criteria. There is an almost endless variety of succulents to fit any decor scheme or outdoor space. As a bonus, they are especially easy to clone yourself.

Succulents have adapted to dry dessert regions with thick leaves to retain water during droughts. For this reason, succulents do not need to be watered as often as other plant varieties. This attribute makes them perfect for the novice or busy gardener; skipping a water every now and then won’t kill your succulents.

 

Most succulents need direct sunlight and grow well in a wide range of temperatures, even in temps as low as 50 degrees Fahrenheit. In the summer water succulents about once a week. Make sure the soil is completely dry between waterings. In the winter reduce waterings down to about once every other month.

Materials Needed:

– Jar or container

-Soil Mixture – We used Sanctuary Soil’s Victory Mix then added in Growstones for better drainage.

-Activated Carbon -Can be found at a pet supply store.

-Drainage material – We used Growstones and seashells

– Succulents in 2 inch pots – Armstrong Garden Center had a great selection.

 

Directions:

1. Place a layer of drainage material in the bottom of your container. We used a mixture of Growstones and seashells. Rocks and pebbles also work well.

2. Next, add a layer of activated carbon over the drainage materials. We purchased our activated carbon from Pet Kingom for $9.99. The carbon removes impurities from your terrarium.

3. Make sure the soil you choose is well aerated. We mixed in smaller Growstones to the soil for better aeration. Succulents require a lot of aeration near their roots, so this step is extremely important.

4. Finally, add a layer of your soil and then plant the succulents in the container. Fill in any gaps with soil. I found that the succulents were delicate, and I used a paint brush to remove any excess dirt that had accumulated on the leaves.

5. Lightly water the soil so that is damp all the way through. Do not over water, you don’t want an excess of water at the bottom of your container.

2 thoughts on “DIY Succulent Terrarium

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