Posts published on January 2014

Garden Salad with Fresh Tahini Dressing

Uncategorized

Made with fresh greens from San Diego Hydroponics & Organics‘ garden and ingredients from People’s Organic Co-op in Ocean Beach, this salad and dressing are easy to recreate with produce from your own garden!

For the salad we used:

  • Kale
  • Arugula
  • Nevada Lettuce
  • Coastal Lettuce
  • 1 Heirloom Tomato
  • 1/2 Cucumber, Sliced
  • 1/4 c. Dried Cranberries
  • 1/2 Apple, Chopped
  • 1/3 c. Chopped Walnuts

 

For the dressing we combined:

  • 3 tbsp Freshly Squeezed Orange Juice
  • 1 1/2 tbsp Freshly Squeezed Lemon Juice
  • 2 tbsp Tahini
  • 1 tbsp Apple Cider Vinegar (can be substituted with coconut vinegar)
  • 2-2 1/2 tbsp Agave Nectar (can be substituted with maple syrup)
  • 1 1/2-2 tsp Dijon Mustard
  • 1/2-1 tsp Fresh Ginger, Finely Chopped
  • pinch Sea Salt
  • 1 tbsp Olive Oil (can be substituted with walnut or hemp oil or may be omitted for oil free)
  • Fresh Ground Black Pepper

Should make about 2/3 cups.

 

Product Spotlight: Method 7 Glasses

Articles, products

Spending a lot of time in your grow room can cause a number of problems, including eye damage from High Intensity Discharge (HID) lights. This can cause serious consequences over time, including cataracts and permanent loss of vision.

 

ALL HID bulbs emit UV light, though the amount and type vary between bulbs. If you read the warning labels, they’re very clear: do NOT attempt to look directly at the bulb or you can receive UV radiation damage.   Many grow rooms use reflectors, so you don’t need to look directly at the bulb to be exposed.

 

Furthermore, high-pressure sodium (HPS) lights are notorious for distorting the natural color rendition of your plants, making everything look yellow instead.  This makes it more difficult to monitor your plants’ health, determine the color of their leaves, and spot pests, diseases, mildews, and mineral deficiencies.   Method 7 glasses compensate for these color imbalances, allowing you to see the normal colors of the plants as if you were in natural daylight.

 

Method Seven glasses can also prevent the “strobe effect,” a phenomenon that negatively affects indoor gardeners working under HPS lights.   This is caused by the lights slightly dimming and getting brighter as the AC voltage cycles, which can be seen by the lines that appear in photographs and film.   Over extended periods of time this strobe effect can cause headaches and make people feel ill.  However if you place a Method Seven lens in front of the camera then the lines will drastically reduce this effect, causing the lines to simply disappear.

 

Made from high-grade mineral glass, Method 7 rendition lenses add specific elements that are atomically bonded into the crystalline structure.   These elements filter out the wavelength of yellow light, which allows you to see natural looking colors in an HPS lighting environment.  All Method 7 lenses were developed in partnership with Carl Zeiss, whose camera lenses are used by millions of photographers all over the world.

 

It’s important to protect yourself and your vision, and to effectively monitor the health of your plants. Method Seven glasses will transform the way you see your garden, and provide the visual clarity you need to catch problems that are difficult to see under HPS lights.    It’s simply the best choice for your eyes, your plants, and your lifestyle.

FREE Raised Bed Raffle

Articles, Gardening, Newsletter

Healthy plants require nutrient rich, well aerated soil, with plenty of drainage. That is hard to come by in San Diego. A great way to start your garden in an area with difficult soil, like clay or sand, is by investing in a raised bed garden. Raised beds are small plots of soil, 3-4 ft wide, laid on top of existing earth. These beds are popular for backyard gardeners because of their space efficiency and near effortless upkeep. Plants are easy to reach from both sides of the bed and building your garden 1-2ft off the ground you will reduce stress on your back. Deep, loose, fertile soil with plenty of room for root zone development and adequate drainage will make your plants healthy and productive.

A raised bed can be created by constructing any size rectangle from rot resistant materials, laying down hardware cloth, then filling with soil. Inexpensive alternatives to building your raised bed from scratch are the Big Bag Bed by Smart Pot or Frame-It-All prefabricated beds, which only need to be filled with a high quality soil.

For your chance to win a Frame-It-All raised bed garden with soil, seeds, propagation materials and nutrients enter here.

 

How to Plant a Resolution Tree

Gardening, Grow Tips, Lifestyle, Uncategorized

The New Year is a time for rejuvenation, replenishment, and growth. What better way to celebrate a fresh start than by planting a tree rooted in your intentions for the coming year? A Resolution Tree is just that, a tree that’s roots literally grow through a penned resolution and nurtured with your hope for the future.

To plant your Resolution Tree you will need:

  • Scrap Paper
  • Writing Utensil
  • Tree (Ready for transplanting)
  • Shovel
  • Water
  • Soil (SDHydro Recommends Roots Organic or Fox Farm soils)
  • Compost (SDHydro Recommends Humisoil from Organic Bountea)
  • Mulch or Bark (Optional)
  • Mad Farmer B1 (Optional)

1)Begin with taking a piece of biodegradable scrap paper and writing your 2014 resolution on it then place to the side.

2)Select a tree type and planting location. Determining the type of tree and location where it is to be planted are interdependent. Factors such as the maturing size of the tree, available space and desired purpose of the tree (fruiting, flowering, wind or shade protection, erosion prevention, restoration of native species or a combination thereof) should be considered. Learn the specific needs of your tree (preferred sunlight,  companion plants, and watering needs) then when selecting a location be mindful of maturing root systems, sidewalks and other possible obstructions of growth. It is important that the tree have adequate space to grow, with abundant sunlight and access to water.

3)Clear an area and dig a hole. Remove any weeds, leaves or brush from the direct area to be planted. Give the planted tree about a three-foot circumference of clearance space. Generally you should dig two feet deeper and two-feet wider than the potted soil that holds the current root system of the tree to ensure that the roots are not restricted.

4)Place your piece of paper with written resolution at the bottom of the hole.

5)Add compost or fertilizer into the bottom of the hole then soak. Use at least 1/3 compost per 2/3 soil.  The more compost, leaf mold or rotted manure used the more likely to satisfy the tree’s nutrient needs. The type and amount of fertilizer needed will vary by variety of tree. If the tree you intend to plant is on the larger size (greater than 2 inches in diameter) the roots may benefit from up to a one-hour soaking in a water bath. Pre-soak the hole prior to planting. This is more important with dry soil that does not hold water well but in general prepares the soil to welcome roots.

6)Carefully remove the tree from the container. The goal is as little root disturbance as possible. Either use clippers to cut the container away from the tree or gently squeeze the sides of the plant container between your hands to loosen the dirt and roots from the container wall while simultaneously letting gravity pull the tree free. After the tree is out of the container, stimulate growth by gingerly massaging the root system before putting the tree in the hole.

7)Place the tree in the hole. Position the flare of the tree (where the stem meets the roots and dirt) to be flush with the ground and clear of debris once fully planted. The stem will rot if buried or covered with damp material (such as soil) and the roots will dry out if exposed to air. Before you begin filling the hole with soil, make sure the roots are resting flat in the hole without being smashed or curved upward into a “J” shape (this is why you dug the hole deeper than necessary).

8)Add a small ring of fertilizer around the base of the tree about four to six inches away from the stem. Take care not to use too much fertilizer or you may burn the plant. Consult the instructions of your specific fertilizer for correct quantities.

9)(Optional)Add mulch or bark around the circumference of the tree. Make a ring of wood chips around the tree about three inches thick. This allows the bark to hold water in the soil and protects the topsoil from the sun. Leave a foot clearance from the edge of the bark boarder to the neck of the tree, the space in between the tree stem and the raised bark boarder create a small water-retaining bowl that is great for efficient and effective watering.

10)Water the tree and watch it grow! We recommend using Mad Farmer’s B1 to assist the plant in healing during the transplant process.